Faculty Technology Use

Item by Item Analysis

Item 1 [data]
I am just beginning to learn how to use basic applications such as word processors and drill and practice software.
Both surveys average a 90% disagreement with this statement. Nearly 10% of faculty consider themselves beginners in the use of basic applications (word processors and drill and practice software).

Item 2 [data]
I am familiar with a variety of applications and often require students to use technology to complete assignments.
There was no significant change in responses for faculty familiar with a variety of applications and requiring students to use technology to complete assignments. There was a rise from 63% in 1998 to 70% in 2001 on agreement with Item 2.

Item 3 [data]
I regularly use technology for collaboration, communication, and research and integrate these processes into classroom instruction.
There was a significant change from 61% agreement in 1998 to 75% agreement in 2001. In 1998, 39% of faculty did not use technology for collaboration, communication, and research and to integrate those processes into instruction. In 2001, only 75% of faculty used technology for collaboration, communication, and research or integrate them into instruction.

Item 4 [data]
I use technology as a tool to craft curriculum and new teaching and learning techniques.
In 1998, 66% agreed and in 2001, 70% agreed. This 4% increase was not statistically significant.

Item 5 [data]
To what extent do you currently incorporate computer technology into classroom instruction?
In 1998, 25% of faculty frequently incorporated technology into classroom instruction; this number increased to 35% in 2001. There was a shift in responses for this item from 'seldom' (loosing 12 percentage points) to 'frequently' (gaining 10 percentage points). The option response 'occasionally' remained at approximately 40% for both survey years. These changes were not statistically significant.

Item 6 [data]
Insufficient technical equipment infrastructure (i.e., cables, routers, wiring) is a barrier to my incorporating computer technology into my classroom instruction (excluding Web-based instruction).
67% of responses agreed with this statement in 1998 and 55% agreed in 2001. Therefore, the perception of infrastructure as a barrier is decreasing, although not significantly.

Item 7 [data]
Insufficient equipment (i.e., computers, servers) is a barrier to my incorporating computer technology into my classroom instruction (excluding Web-based instruction).
A significant change in responses occurred for this item. In 1998, 43% strongly agreed and 3% strongly disagreed; in 2001, 22% strongly agreed and 12% strongly disagreed. Therefore, insufficient equipment as a barrier to incorporating computer technology into classroom instruction (excluding Web-based instruction) has been significantly reduced.

Item 8 [data]
Insufficient technical support (i.e., technology administrators, etc.) is a barrier to my incorporating computer technology into my classroom instruction (excluding Web-based instruction).
Significant changes occurred for this item. The changes occurred most among responses for strongly agree (36% in 1998 and 5% in 2001) and disagree (25% in 1998 and 44% in 2001). Therefore the notion of technical support as insufficient and a barrier have been significantly reduced. If the agree and strongly agree percentages are combined, then overall 70% has been reduced to 34% of faculty who feel that technical support was insufficient and a barrier.

Item 9 [data]
Insufficient personal training on computer technology (excluding Web-based instruction) is a barrier to my incorporating computer technology into my classroom.
The response percentages shifted towards disagreement with statement. Combining agree statements (strongly agree with disagree) highlights the shift in opinion with 44 % agree in 1998 to 27% for 2001. Therefore fewer faculty agree that insufficient personal training on computer technology (excluding Web-based instruction) is a barrier to their incorporating computer technology into the classroom.

Item 10 [data]
Do you currently incorporate Web-based instruction into your course work?
Frequent use of Web-based instruction into course work has significantly increased from 7% in 1998 to 21% in 2001

Item 11 [data]
Insufficient technical equipment infrastructure (i.e., cables, routers, wiring) is a barrier to my incorporating Web-based instruction into my classroom.
Responses for this item have changed from 1998. Disagreement (strongly agree and agree combined) with this statement increased from 23% to 39%. Therefore more than half of the faculty agree in some form that insufficient technical equipment infrastructure (i.e., cables, routers, wiring) is a barrier to incorporating Web-based instruction into the classroom.

Item 12 [data]
Insufficient equipment (i.e., computers, modems, servers) is a barrier to my incorporating Web-based instruction into my classroom."
A significant change occurred among responses for this item. Agreement (strongly agree and agree combined) with this statement shifted from 68% in 1998 to 40% in 2001. Therefore significantly fewer faculty agree that insufficient equipment (i.e., computers, modems, servers) is a barrier to incorporating Web-based instruction into the classroom.

Item 13 [data]
Insufficient technical support (i.e., technology administrators, webmasters, etc.) is a barrier to my incorporating Web-based instruction into my classroom.
Statistically significant changes occurred in response distribution for this item. Agreement (strongly agree and agree combined) shifted from 65% to 39% in 2001. Therefore less than half of the faculty agree that insufficient technical support (i.e., technology administrators, webmasters, etc.) is a barrier to incorporating Web-based instruction into the classroom.

Item 14 [data]
Insufficient personal training on Web-based instruction is a barrier to my incorporating Web-based instruction into my classroom.
Agreement (strongly agree and agree combined) percentage points shifted from 59% in 1998 to 39% in 2001. Therefore significantly fewer faculty agree with this statement.

Item 15 [data]
To what extent do you use word processors?
Responses for this item remain relatively unchanged from 1998. Approximately 96% of faculty use word processors at least once a month.

Item 16 [data]
To what extent do you use spreadsheets?
A small increase has occurred in the use of spreadsheets. More faculty use spreadsheets at least once a month. Percentage points changed from 50% in 1998 to 58% in 2001.

Item 17 [data]
To what extent do you use presentation software?
The percentage of faculty to use presentation software at least once a month increased from 32% in 1998 to 41% in 2001.

Item 18 [data]
To what extent do you use Web publishing software?
Faculty use of Web publishing software at least once a month has increased from 25% to 32%.

Item 19 [data]
To what extent do you use software for collaborative work (e.g., NetMeeting, C-U-See Me, Lotus Notes, etc.)?
The use of software for collaborative work, at least once a month, remains approximately 11% of faculty. However the percentage of faculty to who do not use collaborative software has decreased from 79% in 1998 to 68% in 2001.

Item 20 [data]
To what extent do you use research resources (e.g., CD-ROM or on-line resources)?"
The use of research resources by faculty, at least once a month, has increased from 69% in1998 to 75% in 2001.

Item 21 [data]
To what extent do you require your students to use word processors?
53% of faculty in 1998 required students to use word processors at least once a month. An insignificant increase occurred in 2001 to 57%.

Item 22 [data]
To what extent do you require your students to use spreadsheets?
Approximately 70% of faculty never require students to use spreadsheets in 1998 and 2001.

Item 23 [data]
To what extent do you require your students to use presentation software?
Approximately 60% of faculty never require students to use presentation software both in 1998 and 2001.

Item 24 [data]
To what extent do you require your students to use Web publishing software?
Approximately 87% of faculty in1998 never required students to use Web publishing software and 89% never required students to use it in 2001.

Item 25 [data]
To what extent do you require your students to use software for collaborative work (e.g., NetMeeting, C-U-See Me, Lotus Notes, etc.)?
Approximately 83% of faculty never used the software in 1998 and 82% never used it in 2001. However, 5% in 2001 up from 1% in 1998 use the software less than once a month, but at least once in three months.

Item 26 [data]
To what extent do you require your students to use research resources (e.g., CD-ROM or on-line resources)?
In 1998 37% of faculty required students to use research resources at least once a month and 41% required it in 2001. There was a slight decrease in faculty who never require students to use the resources, from 28% in 1998 to 19% in 2001.

Item 27 [data]
I __________ use e-mail as a part of classroom instruction.
In 1998, 25% of faculty frequently used e-mail as part of classroom instruction; that usage and increased to 32% in 2001. Faculty who never use e-mail as part of classroom instruction decreased from 38% in1998 to 23% in 2001.

Item 28 [data]
I __________ use bulletin boards as a part of classroom instruction.
In 1998, 6% of faculty frequently used bulletin boards as part of classroom instruction and that usage increased to 12% in 2001. Faculty who never use bulletin boards as part of classroom instruction decreased from 75% to 61%.

Item 29 [data]
I __________ use list servers as a part of classroom instruction.
More faculty never use list servers as part of classroom instruction, with 6% (to never use) in 1998 and 76% (to never use) in 2001. Frequent use of list servers was at 5% in1998 and 4% in 2001.

Item 30 [data]
I _______ use chat lines as a part of classroom instruction.
More faculty never use chat line as part of classroom instruction with 6% in 1998 and 81 % in 2001. Frequent use levels were at 1% in 1998 and 5% in 2001.

Item 31 [data]
What is your first preference for receiving training in the use of computer technology?
There has been little change in faculty preferences for receiving training. In decreasing order:

Preference In 1998 In 2001
1. Workshops provided by designated faculty/professional trainer 53% 57%
2. One-on-one instruction 27% 25%
3. Self-paced tutorial 20% 19%

Item 32 [data]
To what extent are you interested in incorporating computer technology in your classes?
Faculty interest at the level of 'very much' for incorporating computer technology into courses has decreased from 65% in 1998 to 57% in 2001. Interest at the 'not at all' level increased from 2% in 1998 to 4% in 2001.

Item 33 [data]
Do you receive encouragement from your institution to integrate computer technology into classroom instruction?"
A yes response in 1998 was given by approximately 90% of faculty and 84% in 2001.

Item 34 [data]
My gender is_________
In 1998 52% of survey responders were male and in 2001 46% were male. Therefore a slight shift in the sex of faculty completing the survey occurred in 2001.

Item 35 [data]
37% of faculty had taught in college for 0-5 years in 1998 and in 2001 the percentage was 23.