Archive for the 'Podcast: Teaching, Learning, and Everything Else' Category

Conversation #31: Inverted Learning

Tuesday, August 25th, 2015

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Download Conversation #31

Aaron Sams

A conversation with Aaron Sams on inverted teaching and learning.

Most of what we’re seeing in terms of the spread of this concept is really kind of a grassroots teacher-to-teacher thing.

Aaron Sams has been an educator since 2000 and is currently the Managing Director of FlippedClass.com, co-founder of The Flipped Learning Network, and is an Adjunct Professor at Saint Vincent College. He was awarded the 2009 Presidential Award for Excellence in Math and Science Teaching and was a Chemistry teacher in Woodland Park, CO and in Hacienda Heights, CA.

Links for this episode:

Podcast Back in the iTunes Store

Monday, July 27th, 2015

Somewhere along the way, our podcast fell off the listing of podcasts in the iTunes store. But we’re back!

Conversation #30: Ecology

Monday, May 11th, 2015

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Download Conversation #30

John Clark

A conversation with John Clark on teaching, learning and ecology.

What is it that could possibly change people to the point that they would not only vaguely care, but make central to their lives, for instance, the survival of southeast Louisiana, or the survival of the human species, or the protection of the thousands and tens of thousands of species that are going extinct every year? What could create this change? And most of what we call education can’t do it and doesn’t do it.

John Clark is a native of the Island of New Orleans, where his family has lived for twelve generations, and where he and all of his children and grandchildren continue to reside. He works with Common Knowledge: The New Orleans Cooperative Education Exchange and the Institute for the Radical Imagination. He was formerly Gregory F. Curtin Distinguished Professor of Humane Letters and the Professions, Professor of Philosophy, and a member of the Environment Program faculty at Loyola University. He continues to teach in the Loyola Summer Program in Dharamsala, India. His books include Max Stirner’s Egoism, The Philosophical Anarchism of William Godwin, The Anarchist Moment, Anarchy, Geography, Modernity, The Impossible Community: Realizing Communitarian Anarchism, and The Tragedy of Common Sense (forthcoming). He edited Renewing the Earth: The Promise of Social Ecology and Elisée Reclus’ Voyage to New Orleans, and co-edited Environmental Philosophy: From Animal Rights to Radical Ecology and Les Français des Etats-Unis. Works under his pseudonym, Max Cafard, include The Surregionalist Manifesto and Other Writings, FLOOD BOOK, Surregional Explorations, and Lightning Storm Mind (forthcoming).  He is at work on a second volume of The Anarchist Moment, Between Earth and Empire, a comprehensive reformulation of the philosophy of social ecology, The Nuclear Thing, an analysis of the radioactive object of the social imagination, The Trail of the Screaming Forehead, a critique of egoism and nihilism, and Bitter Heritage, a historico-philosophical reflection on culture and crisis in nineteenth-century New Orleans, based in part on his translation of four hundred pages of family correspondence from the mid-nineteenth century. He writes a column, “Imagined Ecologies,” for the journal Capitalism Nature Socialism, and edits the cyberjournal Psychic Swamp: The Surregional Review. His interests include dialectical thought, ecological philosophy, environmental ethics, anarchist and libertarian thought, the social imaginary, cultural critique, Buddhist and Daoist philosophy, and the crisis of the Earth. He has long been active in the radical ecology and communitarian anarchist movements. He works on ecological restoration and eco-communitarianism, which he is striving to put into practice on an 87-acre land project on Bayou LaTerre, in the forest of coastal Mississippi. He is a member of the Education Workers’ Union of the Industrial Workers of the World.

Links for this episode:

Conversation #29: Sustainability in Higher Education

Wednesday, January 14th, 2015

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Download Conversation #29

Meghan Fay Zanhiser

A conversation with Meghan Fay Zanhiser of the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education on teaching, learning and sustainability in higher education.

We are a nonprofit membership-based organization that exists to serve anyone in higher education working on sustainability.

Meghan Fay Zanhiser is the Executive Director for the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education (AASHE). She has been with AASHE for six years and previously held the positions of Director of Programs and STARS Program Manager. Previously, Meghan worked as Sustainability Specialist at NELSON, where she provided sustainability expertise and consulting services to various clients. She also spent over five years working at the U.S. Green Building Council where, as Manager of Community, she developed and managed a local chapter network for building industry professionals and helped create the Emerging Green Builders program that integrates students and young professionals into the green building movement. Meghan also worked as Environmental Educator for the University at Buffalo Green Office, organizing campus and community education focused on energy conservation, green building, and sustainable living. She holds a bachelor’s degree in Social Sciences, with concentrations in environmental studies and health & human services, from the University at Buffalo and a master’s degree in Organization Management and Development from Fielding Graduate Institute.

Links for this episode:

Conversation #28: Service Learning

Tuesday, December 9th, 2014

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Download Conversation #28

Jeremy Tuman

A conversation with Jeremy Tuman of Xavier University of Louisiana on teaching, learning and service learning.

Ultimately I think a transformative experience is one in which students internalize the idea that reality is not fixed — that all of these social problems are products, by-products, results of social structures that we as people create. We create them, and we can change them.

Jeremy Tuman teaches composition and literature with an emphasis on bringing basic writers into the larger academic curriculum. His scholarship on the pedagogy of basic writing is influenced by Mike Rose and David Bartholomae, who argue that basic writers must fully engage in exercises of critical thought regardless of their grammatical or mechanical competency. To this approach he incorporates the added charge of Xavier and other HBCUs and Catholic schools to teach a moral and social imperative for critical thought.

Jeremy has designed and led service-learning initiatives with community partners involved in literacy outreach and in post-Katrina rebuilding. Jeremy is a 2012-2013 Mellon FaCTS Fellow, a fellowship to promote social justice and civic engagement in the classroom, and currently serves as Faculty-in-Residence for Service Learning at the Center for the Advancement of Teaching.

Links for this episode:

Conversation #27: Civic Engagement

Friday, November 21st, 2014

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Download Conversation #27

Amy Koritz

A conversation with Amy Koritz of Drew University on teaching, learning and civic engagement.

Saying to somebody there’s a 20% poverty rate is very different from introducing them to somebody who is in poverty and hearing their story.

Amy Koritz is the director for the Center for Civic Engagement at Drew University and professor of English. As the director of the Center for Civic Engagement, Dr. Kortiz is integral to the development of sustaining partnerships between the university and the community. She is the co-editor of Civic Engagement in the Wake of Katrina and author of Culture Makers: Urban Performance and Literature in the 1920s.

Links for this episode:

Conversation #26: Sustainability

Tuesday, October 14th, 2014

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Download Conversation #26

Daniel Greenberg

A conversation with Daniel Greenberg of Earth Deeds on teaching, learning and sustainability.

We can’t just rely on our government leaders or our corporations or scientists to fix this. We’re going to have to think about our relationships in different ways and we’re going to have to understand things in a different way so together we can actually live more sustainably.

Links for this episode:

Meet Your New Host

Wednesday, August 27th, 2014

CAT is pleased to announce our new podcast host, Dr. Megan Osterbur. Look forward to her first episode of Teaching, Learning & Everything Else in this space next month.

Dr. Megan Osterbur Dr. Megan Osterbur is a Political Science faculty member in the Division of Social and Behavioral Sciences. In addition to Political Science courses, Dr. Osterbur teaches courses in the Women’s Studies program as well as Black Politics, a part of the African American and Diaspora Studies at Xavier. Her research on teaching pedagogy includes “Does Mechanism Matter? Student Recall of Electronic versus Handwritten Feedback,” which she co-authored with Dr. Elizabeth Yost Hammer and Dr. Elliott Hammer. In the summer of 2014 she also participated in the National Women’s Studies Association Curriculum Institute.

Host Our Podcast

Thursday, August 7th, 2014

Follow the Arrow

CAT is seeking a new host for the next season of our podcast, Teaching, Learning, and Everything Else (a finalist for the POD Network Innovation Award). Each episode features a conversation with a teacher in higher education, and topics have ranged from humor in the classroom to grade inflation.

A well-qualified host is someone who is:

  • passionate about teaching and learning,
  • interested in the practices and philosophies of colleagues around the world,
  • comfortable speaking on the phone with strangers, and
  • not afraid to hear his or her own voice on a recording.

Responsibilities include:

  • working with CAT’s Media Artist, Bart Everson, to identify potential interviewees,
  • contacting candidates to arrange interviews, and
  • recording eight interviews over the course of the academic year.

Rewards are many. The podcast host will learn a lot about the current state of the art of teaching. A $500 honorarium will be awarded.

Past hosts have included Ray Lang, Alexios Moore, and Elizabeth Hammer. If you are interested in joining these illustrious ranks, apply today. Simply drop a line to CAT’s Media Artist indicating your interest.

Conversation #25: Critical Thinking

Tuesday, April 29th, 2014

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Download Conversation #25

Noam Chomsky

Quite typically institutions almost of any kind try to enforce conformity, obedience and passivity. They don’t try to encourage the kind of critical thought and action which will threaten the structure of power and domination…

A conversation with Noam Chomsky (MIT) on teaching, learning and critical thinking.

Links for this episode: