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In an attempt to make students start working on a research project long before 24 hours from the due date, as well as discuss plagiarism and the pitfalls of research on the internet, I've been researching the internet myself.

I checked into Google Alerts.  I've been experimenting with setting up the searches and verifying the results.  It's quite easy to begin using immediately.  So I suggest that at the beginning of the course when discussing the syllabus, instructors take about 5 minutes to have the students set up a Google Alert on their mobile devices for each possible research topic they may wish to explore.

For Google Alerts, there is very little to fill out and you can specify how often to receive notification that matches to your search have been found:

Google Alerts is fast and simple to use
Google Alerts is fast and simple to use.

By having the students set up weekly alerts and seeing that they can limit their searches instead of being overwhelmed with a million hits, it is hoped that at least once a week (or however often they have set up the alert), they will be thinking about their research project throughout the semester rather than at the last minute.  Happy searching!

If you use any Google services, you've undoubtedly noted their new privacy policy, since they've been springing pop-up alerts to users over the past month or so.

How does it all boil down?

Sharon Vaknin offers a concise summary of the changes and why you might have cause for concern:
Five ways Google's unified privacy policy affects you