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What does it mean to bring a contemplative approach to the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning? That's the subject of an upcoming webinar from the Association for Contemplative Mind in Higher Education. ...continue reading "SoTL Webinar"

A webinar with David Sable, Religious Studies, Saint Mary's University
Tuesday, December 16, 2014, 2:30-3:30pm CST
Free and open to the public

REGISTER

In this interactive presentation, participants will be introduced to a set of mindfulness-based reflective practices for the classroom that were the subject of mixed methods research with university students over five years. The practices apply basic mindfulness principles and guided instruction for individual contemplation, journal writing, listening, inquiry, and dialogue in a student-centered learning format.

Taken together, this set of practices becomes reflective interaction; however the elements are also useful individually or in any combination. These practices and the results of the research were described in the first issue of The Journal of Contemplative Inquiry, published by the Center for Contemplative Mind in Society.

The same set of practices will be applied in this interactive webinar to help you develop indicators for what matters most in introducing any contemplative practices in your teaching. Participants will explore their intentions, including what matters most to them as the instructor, what matters most to their students, and how they can know if contemplative pedagogy is effective. Results will be shared online and documented by the recording.

Note: This webinar is being offered by the Association for Contemplative Mind in Higher Education.

The National Institute for Technology in Liberal Education (NITLE) has invited Xavier faculty and staff to a rare open seminar titled, "Race and the Digital Humanities: An Introduction."

This is an online seminar, or webinar, so no travel is necessary. It's also quite unusual for a NITLE seminar to be open to non-members, so there's no cost.

The seminar will give a brief survey of the emerging field of race and the digital humanities, introduce the audience to a variety of digital projects informed by race, and provide links to resources for people interested in working in this field. Topics covered will include: the genealogy of these debates, the theoretical assumptions that inform them, and issues to consider while constructing a race and digital humanities project.

Dr. Adeline Koh is a visiting faculty fellow at Duke University (2012-2013) and an assistant professor of literature at Richard Stockton College. She is also a core contributor to the Profhacker blog at The Chronicle of Higher Education, and a member of the Editorial Board for Anvil Academic. (Follow her on Twitter.)

The seminar takes place Friday, November 16, 3 – 4pm Central Time.

If you are interested, register now.